What does a telecom engineer do?

New Zealand has one of the most stable economies in the world, and is a great destination for telecom engineers who want to contribute to building a telecom network smarter. New Zealand is a large country with over 4 million citizens, but it still faces an engineering deficit in its work force, meaning that jobs for engineers in New Zealand are many and varied.

Switzerland can be an equally fruitful destination to seek out telecom engineering jobs abroad. This infamously neutral country is one of the wealthiest in the world, and no small part of this stems directly from its success in innovative engineering. Scientific research and manufacturing are both vital components of the Swiss economy, so telecom engineers would do well to look for work abroad in this peaceful European nation.
Despite the growth of the Internet, the characteristics of local area networks (“LANs” – computer networks that do not extend beyond a few kilometers in size) remain distinct. This is because networks on this scale do not require all the features associated with larger networks and are often more cost-effective and efficient without them. When they are not connected with the Internet, they also have the advantages of privacy and security. However, purposefully lacking a direct connection to the Internet will not provide 100% protection of the LAN from hackers, military forces, or economic powers. These threats exist if there are any methods for connecting remotely to the LAN.

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